Precedence Diagram Method (PDM) is a visual representation technique that depicts the activities involved in a project. It is a method of constructing a project schedule network diagram that uses boxes/nodes to represent activities and connects them with arrows that show the dependencies. The Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) and Critical Path Method (CPM) techniques are essentially limited to “finish-start” relationships (i.e., activity B cannot start until activity A is completed). PDM was developed subsequent to the PERT/CPM techniques and its function is to permit a more accurate depiction of relationships among various activities.

There are four (4) types of dependencies that you need to be aware of before creating a Precedence Diagram.

  • Finish-Start: In this dependency, an activity cannot start before a previous activity has ended. This is the most commonly used dependency.
  • Start-Start: In this dependency, there is a defined relationship between the start of activities.
  • Finish-Finish: In this dependency, there is a defined relationship between the end dates of activities.
  • Start-Finish: In this dependency, there is a defined relationship between the start of one activity and the end date of a successor activity. This dependency is rarely used.

Network scheduling techniques provide managers with a powerful tool for scheduling and controlling their programs/projects. In general, they permit the graphic portrayal of project activities and relationships among the activities. This provides the basis for determining the project’s critical path, predicting shortages, and identifying possible reallocation of resources to solve problems. Through the use of readily available software, network schedules are fairly easy to update and rework, thus providing managers with current program/project status information and control over activities and schedules. [1]

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Updated: 7/29/2017

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