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Space Acquisitions

Joint Publication 3-14 Space Operations

JP3-14

JP 3-14 Space Operations

 

Joint Publication 3-14 Space Operations provides joint doctrine for planning joint space operations.

Purpose
This publication sets forth joint doctrine to govern the activities and performance of the Armed Forces of the United States in joint operations and provides the doctrinal basis for interagency coordination and for US military involvement in multinational operations. It provides military guidance for the exercise of authority by combatant commanders and other joint force commanders (JFCs) and prescribes joint doctrine for operations, education, and training. It provides military guidance for use by the Armed Forces in preparing their appropriate plans.

Content Overview

  • Provides the Fundamentals of Military Space Operations
  • Discusses the Space Mission Areas:
    • Space Situational Awareness,
    • Space Force
    • Enhancement,
    • Space Support,
    • Space Control, and
    • Space Force Application
  • Explains the Command and Control of Space Forces
  • Presents the Roles and Responsibilities for Space Operations
  • Addresses Space Operations Planning and the Joint Space Tasking Order

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JCIDS Process

Joint Operations Concepts (JOpsC)

 

Joint Operations Concepts (JOpsC) is a family of joint future concepts consisting of a Capstone Concept for Joint Operations (CCJO), Joint Operating Concepts (JOC), Joint Functional Concepts (JFC), and Joint Integrating Concepts (JIC). The objective of JOpsC is to guide the transformation of the joint force so that it is prepared to operate successfully 8 to 20 years in the future.  They are a visualization of future operations and describe how a commander, using military art and science, might employ capabilities necessary to successfully meet challenges in the future.

 

The JOpsC should produce military capabilities that render previous ways of warfighting obsolete and may significantly change the measures of success in military operations overall. JOpsC presents a detailed description of “how” future operations may be conducted and provides the conceptual basis for joint experimentation and Capabilities-Based Assessments (CBAs). The outcomes of experimentation and CBA will underpin investment decisions leading to the development of new military capabilities beyond the Future Years Defense Program (FDYP). [1]

 

The JOpsC is a family of joint future concepts consisting of the:

  • Capstone Concept for Joint Operations (CCJO):  Overarching concept that guides the development of future joint force capabilities. It broadly describes how the joint force is expected to operate 8-20 years in the future in all domains across the range of military operations within a multilateral environment and in collaboration with interagency and multilateral partners.
  • Joint Operating Concepts (JOCs): Applies the CCJO solution in greater detail to a specified mission area, and describes how a joint force commander, 8-20 years in the future, is expected to conduct operations within a military campaign.
  • Joint Functional Concepts (JFCs): Applies elements of the Capstone Concept for Joint Operations solution to describe how the joint force, 8-20 years in the future, will perform an enduring military function across the full range of military operations, and identifies the operational-level capabilities required to support the full range of military operations. Also determines any additional military capabilities required to create the effects identified in JOCs.
  • Joint Integrating Concepts (JICs): Operational-level description of how a joint force commander, 8-20 years in the future, will perform a specific operation or function derived from a Joint Operating Concept and/or a Joint Functional Concept. They are narrowly scoped to identify, describe, and apply specific military capabilities, decomposing them into fundamental tasks, conditions, and standards.

Services, combatant commands, and Defense agencies conduct basic research, explore emerging technologies, generate innovative concepts, and conduct experimentation to develop service-unique or joint capabilities. These efforts provide the context for analyzing capabilities for the future joint force beyond the FYDP. The results of this analysis will influence Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution (PPBE) decisions as well as identify potential future concepts for the JOpsC family.

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Updated: 7/12/2017

JCIDS Process

Joint Capability Document (JCD)

 

Update: The JCD has been eliminated and the functions of the document has been incorporated into the Initial Capabilities Document (ICD).  JCDs developed under a previous version of CJCSI 3170.01 are still accepted per guidance in Enclosure B.


The Joint Capabilities Document (JCD) is a requirements document that was developed to capture a set of joint capabilities for a system under development. The JCD was the results of the Functional Area Analysis (FAA) and Functional Needs Analysis (FNA). It identifies critical performance measures associated with these capabilities and prioritizes gaps based on operational considerations and the timeframe under consideration. The JCD was used as the baseline for the investigation of what to do about the shortfall in capability in the Functional Solutions Analysis (FSA).

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Updated: 8/02/2017

JCIDS Process

Joint Capabilities Board (JCB)

 

The Joint Capabilities Board (JCB) assists the Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC) in carrying out its duties and responsibilities. The JCB reviews and, if appropriate, endorses all Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System (JCIDS and Doctrine, Organization, Training, Materiel, Leadership, Personnel, Facilities and Policy (DOTMLPF-P) Change Recommendation (DCR) documents prior to their submission to the JROC.

 

The JCB is chaired by the Joint Staff Director, J-8. The J-8 Directorate develops capabilities, conducts studies, analysis, and assessments, and evaluates plans, programs, and strategies for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Director, J-8 also serves as JROC Secretary. In these capacities, the Director orchestrates Joint Staff support of the capabilities development process through the JCIDS Process and oversees the Functional Capabilities Board (FCB) process.

Updated: 7/12/2017

JCIDS Process

JCIDS Studies Repository

 

The Joint Staff (JS) Deputy Director for Requirements (J-8) serves as the JCIDS Gatekeeper for the Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System (JCIDS) Process and maintains a studies repository to facilitate visibility into studies related to capability requirements and the generation of JCIDS documents. Sponsors provide the results of any studies or analyses intended to support JCIDS documents to the studies repository. The posted study materials facilitate more streamlined requirements documentation, allowing JCIDS documents to refer to the study data rather than replicate information unnecessarily. [1]

 

The studies repository is also used to capture assessments of Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD), Joint Urgent Operational Need (JOUN) and other demonstrations of capability solutions in an operational environment, as well as other alternative forms of supporting documentation for capability requirements. [1]

 

Historical study data in the repository also facilitate the leverage of prior studies and efforts across the Joint Force to reduce unnecessary duplication of prior efforts and enable shorter timelines with more focused study efforts. To the greatest extent possible, the sponsors should leverage historical information from the studies repository and other sources, and focus Capabilities Based Assessment (CBA) and other studies only in areas that require new or updated analysis. [1]

 

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Update: 7/12/2017

JCIDS Process

JCIDS Responsibilities

  1. Functional Capabilities Board (FCB)

The responsibilities of the FCB include ensuring that DOTMLPF Change Recommendations (DCR) and policy aspects of new capabilities are being appropriately considered in the JCIDS documents, evaluate the Key Performance Parameters (KPP) submitted by the sponsor, identify other potential KPPs, ensure leadership organization participates in the JCIDS process, assist with comments resolution, ensure that overarching joint DCRs are consistent with the Concept of Operations (CONOPS) and support joint warfighting capability needs, and ensure that appropriate certifications and endorsements have been granted. More detail is available in the JCIDS Manual Enclosure E.

  1. FCB Working Groups

The responsibilities of the FCB working groups are to coordinate and assist the sponsor during JCIDS document development, support the JCIDS Gatekeeper (J-8), evaluate the KPPs, coordinate and support the lead FCB working group analysis of JCIDS documents, and provide a summary analysis and recommendation to the FCB on validation and/or approval of JCIDS documents. More detail is available in the JCIDS Manual Enclosure E.

  1. Sponsor

The Sponsors responsibilities are to make affordability determinations, develop JCIDS documentation, develop a Capability Development Document (CDD), Capability Production Document (CPD), or joint DCR, resolve issues that arise during the staffing, certification, and validation processes, and coordinate with sponsors, and present briefings to decision bodies. More detail is available in the JCIDS Manual Enclosure E.

  1. Services

The Services are responsible for coordinating on Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC) Interest and documents and may review Joint Integration, Joint Information, and Independent documents developed by other sponsors to identify opportunities for cross-component utilization and harmonization of capabilities. More detail is available in the JCIDS Manual Enclosure E.

  1. Joint Staff

  • Joint Staff Director (J-1): Office of primary responsibility for joint manpower and personnel reviews.
  • Joint Staff Director (J-2): will review and conduct intelligence certification
  • Joint Staff Director (J-3): Office of primary responsibility for the current Global Command and Control (GCC) family of systems, future command and control capabilities, and the common operational picture.
  • Joint Staff Director (J-4): Be responsible for joint facilities reviews.
  • Joint Staff Director (J-5): will act as Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) Executive Agent for implementing JROC decisions regarding multinational and interagency requirements and joint DCRs with multinational or interagency impacts.
  • Joint Staff Director (J-6): Perform IT and NSS interoperability and supportability certifications on all CDDs and CPDs designated as JROC Interest, JCB Interest or Joint Integration
  • Joint Staff Director (J-7): oversee the writing, development, and revision of the Joint Operation Concept.
  • Joint Staff Director (J-8): JCIDS Gatekeeper, review and evaluate all DCR, and assess the readiness and responsiveness of combat support agencies.
  1. Combatant Commanders

The responsibilities of the Combatant Commander include providing input to the JROC requirements, review and comment on JROC documents, and conduct a Senior Warfare Forum that identifies capabilities needed and gaps or redundancies that exist. More detail is available in the JCIDS Manual Enclosure E.

  1. National Guard Bureau

The Chief of the National Guard Bureau (NGB) is the principal advisor to the Secretary of Defense on National Guard issues who is responsible for administering joint programs, leading the development of National Guard joint capabilities and concepts for National Guard homeland defense and civil support missions. More detail is available in the JCIDS Manual Enclosure E.

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Updated: 7/12/2017

JCIDS Process

JCIDS Manual of Operations

JCIDS Manual of Operations

JCIDS Manual of Operations

Replaced

Note: The Manual for the Operations of the Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System (JCIDS) has been replaced by CJCSI 5123.01H.

Note: The new Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Instruction (CJCSI) 5123.01H “Charter Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC) and Implementation of the Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System (JCIDS)” replaces the CJCSI 31070.01.


The Manual for the Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System (JCIDS) provides procedural guidance for the overall JCIDS process as well as other requirements-related processes and activities. The manual includes mandatory training for personnel involved in the requirements processes, capability requirement portfolio management, identification of capability requirements and associated capability gaps, development of capability requirement documents, gatekeeping, and staffing procedures.  [1] 

Table of Content

  1. Purpose
  2. Cancellation
  3. Application
  4. Purpose
  5. Summary of Major Changes
  6. Releasability
  7. Effective Date
  8. Enclosures
    1. Requirements Management Certification Training
    2. Capability Requirements Portfolio Management
    3. Initial Identification of Capability Requirements and Associated Capability Gaps
    4. Capability Requirements Document Generation
    5. Gatekeeping
    6. Deliberate Staffing Process
    7. Urgent/Emergent Staffing Processes
    8. References
    9. Glossary 

JCIDS Overview

Figure: Overview of the JCIDS Process and JCIDS Manual Enclosures [1]

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Updated: 11/13/2018

JCIDS Process

JCIDS Gatekeeper

 

The Joint Staff (JS) Deputy Director for Requirements (J-8) serves as the Gatekeeper for the Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System (JCIDS) Process. This individual makes the initial joint potential designation of JCIDS documents and determines lead and supporting Functional Capabilities Boards (FCB) for capability documents. The Gatekeeper is supported in these functions by FCB working group leads and the JS. [1]

– See J8 Force Structure, Resources, and Assessment Directorate

 

The Gatekeeper manages the overall flow of documents into and out of the JCIDS process for staffing and validation, in addition to other activities in support of the JCIDS process. [1]

  • The intelligence community (IC) maintains a common Gatekeeper function for the Intelligence Community Capability Requirements (ICCR) and JCIDS processes. Documents for both processes are submitted to the Gatekeeper to initiate staffing and ensure appropriate visibility and participation across processes.
  • Sponsor organizations submitting and/or commenting upon JCIDS documents will have a Gatekeeper function providing a single point of entry into the JCIDS process, and if applicable, the ICCR process, and facilitating communications between the Joint Staff Gatekeeper and principals in Sponsor organizations.

Gatekeeping for ICDs, CDDs, CPDs, and Joint DCRs

 

The Gatekeeper provides the initial review of incoming documents and performs several activities prior to documents entering staffing:[1]

  • Reviews each document submitted to confirm that the document is complete and ready for staffing.
  • Confirms that Capabilities Based Assessment (CBA), studies, and other similar supporting materials for the document have been uploaded to the Knowledge Management/Decision Support (KM/DS) Studies repository, or if not appropriate for the KM/DS studies repository, have been linked and/or appended as attachments to the document.
  • May reject documents that are not properly formatted when the format issues cannot be easily corrected during post-staffing comment resolution. Document rejection terminates the Joint requirements process until corrective actions are taken, and the revised document is accepted by the Gatekeeper.
  • Identify lead FCB and supporting FCBs as needed.
  • Assign one of five Joint Staffing Designator (JSDs), based on actual/potential Acquisition Category (ACAT) and Joint Staff equities. The JSD sets the staffing path and timeline for the document and identifies the validation authority.

 

The Gatekeeper is the approval authority for Initial Capabilities Document (ICD) and Capability Development Document (CDD) waiver requests (see ICD and CDD Waiver Request).

 

The Gatekeeper maintains the JCIDS Studies Repository to facilitate visibility into, and potential reuse of, studies related to capability requirements and the generation of JCIDS documents.

 

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Updated: 7/12/2017

JCIDS Process

J8 Force Structure Resources and Assessment Directorate

 

The Force Structure, Resources, and Assessment Directorate, J-8, was established in response to increased responsibilities and authority placed on the Chairman by the Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986. Since then, J-8 has provided resource and force structure analysis and advice to the Chairman and the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS). See JCIDS Gatekeeper

The J-8 Directorate develops capabilities, conducts studies, analyses, and assessments, and evaluates plans, programs, and strategies for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Director, J-8 serves as Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC) Secretary and as Chairman of the Joint Capabilities Board (JCB). In these capacities, the Director orchestrates Joint Staff support of the capabilities development process through Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System (JCIDS) and oversees the Functional Capabilities Board (FCB) process.

The J-8 Directorate is charged with providing support to CJCS for evaluating and developing force structure requirements. J-8 conducts joint, bilateral, and multilateral war games and interagency politico-military seminars and simulations. It develops, maintains, and improves the models, techniques, and capabilities used by the Joint Staff and combatant commands to conduct studies and analyses for CJCS.

The J8 Directorate’s objectives to support the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff are to:

  • Improve the Capabilities Based Process
  • Provide early capability development guidance to the Services
  • Assess non-traditional Warfighting areas
  • Advise on force structure integration and assess sufficiency of the global joint force to execute the Defense Strategy
  • Review and assess Service programs to advise on joint Warfighting capabilities

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Program Management

Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD)

Defense Acquisition System

 

Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD) is the DoD management technique that simultaneously integrates all essential acquisition activities through the use of Integrated Product Teams (IPT) to optimize design, manufacturing, and supportability processes. IPPD facilitates meeting cost and performance objectives from product concept through production, including field support.  It evolved in industry as an outgrowth of efforts such as Concurrent Engineering to improve customer satisfaction and competitiveness in a global economy. [1]

 

The DoD defines IPPD as, “A management technique that integrates all acquisition activities starting with requirements definition through production, fielding/deployment and operational support in order to optimize the design, manufacturing, business and supportability processes.”

 

Guide: DoD Guide to Integrated Product and Process Development – 5 Feb 1996

 

The ten (10) tenets of IPPD can be summarized into the following five (5) principles: [1]

  1. Customer Focus: It’s accomplished by including the customer in decision-making and on multidisciplinary teams. Conducting tradeoff studies during the requirements definition and development processes also ensures that the design remains consistent with customer needs. The specific tradeoff analysis process that is focused on reducing and controlling life-cycle cost, while meeting the customer needs, is called Cost as an Independent Variable (CAIV).
  2. Concurrent Development of Products and Processes: It refers to the simultaneous development of the deliverable product and all of the processes necessary to make the product (development processes) and to make that product work (deliverable processes). These processes can significantly influence both the acquisition and life-cycle cost of the product.
  3. Early and Continuous Life-Cycle Planning: It’s accomplished by having stakeholders, representing all aspects of a product’s life-cycle, as part of the IPT.  Early life-cycle planning with customers, functional representatives, and suppliers lay a solid foundation for the various phases of a product and its processes. Key program activities and events should be defined so that progress toward the achievement of cost-effective targets can be tracked, resources can be applied, and the impact of problems, resource constraints, and requirements changes can be better understood and managed. Early emphasis on life-cycle planning ensures the delivery of a system that will be functional, affordable, and supportable throughout a product’s life cycle.
  4. Proactive Identification and Management of Risk: It’s accomplished in many ways in the IPPD environment. By using the IPT teamwork approach, designers, manufacturers, testers, and customers work together to ensure that the product satisfies customer needs. DoD endorses a risk management concept that is forward-looking, structured, informative, and continuous. The key to successful risk management is early planning and aggressive execution. IPPD is key to an organized, comprehensive, and iterative approach for identifying and analyzing cost, technical, and schedule risks and instituting risk-handling options to control critical risk areas. IPTs develop technical and business performance measurement plans with appropriate metrics to monitor the effectiveness and degree of anticipated and actual achievement of technical and business parameters.
  5. Maximum Flexibility for Optimization and Use of Contractor Approaches:  IPPD is a management approach, not a specific set of steps to be followed. The Government acquisition community recognizes that it must allow contractors the flexibility to use innovative, streamlined best practices when applicable throughout the program.

 

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Updated: 5/31/2018